Artist Resume/Artist CV Sample—Examples and Writing Tips

See the best artist resume/CV examples. Follow step-by-step instructions and writing tips to create an artist resume that will get jobs.

Michael Tomaszewski, CPRW
Michael Tomaszewski, CPRW
Artist Resume/Artist CV Sample—Examples and Writing Tips

Your art speaks for itself.

 

You have an impressive portfolio.

 

Do you even need an artist resume or an artist CV?

 

Oh, very much so.

 

Whether you’re applying for exhibitions, residencies, grants, or art awards, selection committees will expect to see your art resume.

 

And in order to beat hundreds of other candidates, yours will have to be perfect.

 

In 7 minutes you’ll learn how to write an artist resume/CV like that.

 

This guide will show you:

  • Artist resume examples better than most.
  • How to describe your artistic experience to get jobs, grants, or commissions.
  • The best way to write your artist profile or summary statement.
  • Why picking the right few achievements is the #1 key to get hired.

 

artist resume example

 Create a job-winning resume with little effort. Hack your way through ATS software with our 18 beautiful templates—give our builder a try!

Create my resume now

 

Artist Resume Template You Can Copy, Adjust, and Use

 

Carrie Ligon
Visual Artist
591-124-5551
c.ligon@me.com
c.j.ligon.art.com
linkedin.com/in/carrieligon

 

Summary Statement

 

Visual artist seeking residency at ABC Gallery to create art aimed at raising the public awareness of local housing problems. Awarded the 2016 Leonore Annenberg Prize for Art and Social Change for a steel sculpture Runaway. Have participated in 20+ group exhibitions and 5 solo shows.

 

Education

 

MFA, cum laude, Studio Art 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
2012

 

Grants and Awards

 

2016, The Leonore Annenberg Prize for Art and Social Change (The Creative Time Summit)
2013, Artist-in-Residency Fellowship, XYZ Art Center, Philadelphia, PA
2012, 3rd Place, ABC International Fine Art Competition

 

Selected Exhibitions

 

2018, Solo Exhibition, Staring at the Sun, Anyname Gallery, New York, NY (Curated by JohnMcKane)
2016, Solo Exhibition, Conflicting Futures, Lee Hansley Gallery, Raleigh, NC (Curated by Natalie Fox)
2013, Group Exhibition, The Practice of Space, XYZ Gallery, Newark, NJ (Juror: Frank Hallmann, Curated by Minnie DeMarco)

 

Commissions

 

2017, Public Art Commission, Shimmer, Steel Sculpture, Flowerville Convention Center
2015, Corporate Commission, Southern Lady, Oil on Canvas, JPMorgan Chase & Co. New York

 

Selected Bibliography

 

“Carrie Ligon and the Questions of Identity,” Modern Philosophy 111, no. 2 (April 2016): 170.
“A Story About Space,” XYZ Review 38, no. 1 (2015): 212.
"Let It All Go," University of Oklahoma Press 18 (March 2015): 37.

 

Publications as Author

 

“This Is Not America.” New Yorker, April 17, 2017.
"Performing for the Camera." In Contemporary Conceptual Photography, edited by James
McIlroy Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire, and London: Macmillan Press Ltd., 2016.
“Snap Makes a Bet on the Cultural Supremacy of the Camera.” New York Times, March 8, 2014.
https://www.nytimes.com/this-is-a-fake-url/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html.

 

Work Experience

 

Art Teacher
Anytown University, Anytown, PA
2014–2015

  • Taught daily art classes to groups of 15 to 40 students.
  • Planned, evaluated, and revised curricula, course content, and course materials.
  • Explained and demonstrated artistic techniques: oil painting, watercolor, photography, and printmaking.
  • Received 90% positive feedback from anonymous end-of-term student surveys.

 

Current Representation: Gagosian Gallery, 555 W 24th St, New York City, NY 10011, (212) 741-1111

 

Writing an artist CV for academic admissions? Switch over to Academic CV Samples and Guidelines

 

For guidelines on how to write a graphic artist resume or a 3D artist resume for positions outside of the institutionalized art world (in other words, jobs at companies, not museums or galleries), see: Graphic Design Artist Resume Samples and Guidelines

 

Read on for step-by-step guidelines on how to write a good artist resume!

 

1. Use a Professional Artist Resume Template

 

As an artist, you need different kinds of art resumes for different purposes. The main focus of your artistic CV will depend on what exactly you apply for.

 

But one key thing is always the same—

 

Your artist resume needs an elegant layout, template, and formatting. A poorly formatted CV might get your application rejected at first glance.

 

Artist CV Format Guidelines

 

  1. Set one-inch margins on all sides.
  2. Pick a good CV font and stick to it throughout your CV. Standard CV fonts like Arial, Times New Roman, and Georgia are best.
  3. Use 10-12pt font size for all sections. Go for a slightly large typeface for section headings and your name.
  4. Set single line spacing.
  5. Left-align all contents.
  6. Put an extra space before and after every heading.
  7. When listing bibliography about your work or your own publications, be consistent with the citation style (APA, MLA, or Chicago).

 

Then, decide on the structure and the order of sections of your artist resume or artist CV.

 

Start with your contact information. Follow it with the education section so that the selection committee will be able to place you institutionally.

 

Further below, order your artist resume sections by competitiveness and prestige.

 

But remember to focus on what’s most important to the post you’re applying for.

 

If it’s an exhibition, put emphasis on the exhibitions you participated in. A residency or fellowship? These go further up on your art CV.

 

See the suggested layout of sections for reference.

 

Artist Resume/CV Template

 

  1. Contact Information (with a link to an online portfolio or a professional website)
  2. Artist Profile or Summary Statement (optional)
  3. Education
  4. Grants and Awards (including fellowships)
  5. Exhibitions
  6. Commissions (if applicable)
  7. Collections (if applicable)
  8. Bibliography (about you and your body of work)
  9. Publications as Author
  10. Professional Affiliations and Memberships
  11. Other Experience (including teaching experience)
  12. References (optional)
  13. Current Representation (if applicable)

Expert Hint: Once you’re done writing your art resume, save it as a PDF file to keep the layout intact across all devices. But double-check with the opening if PDFs are accepted. If not, submit your resume in DOC.

Writing an artist resume for a full-time job outside of galleries or museums? For instance, a 3D artist resume or a freelance graphic artist resume?

 

Use a more compact artistic resume template highlighting your work history.

 

Artist Resume Template (Non-Gallery, Non-Museum Applications)

 

  1. Contact Information
  2. Resume Summary or Resue Objective
  3. Work Experience
  4. Education
  5. Skills
  6. Additional Sections

 

2. Write a Well-Crafted Artist Statement or Artist Profile

 

This section is optional.

 

Generally, use it only if applying for full-time art jobs, grants, or residencies.

 

Leave it off if you’re creating an award application or an exhibition proposal to a museum or gallery.

 

Think of your summary statement as a sales pitch for your artist resume. Summarize your most important professional achievements and explain the purpose of your art CV.

 

See what I mean in these two very different examples.

 

Artist Statement/Artist Profile Examples

GOOD EXAMPLE
Visual artist seeking residency at ABC Gallery to create art aimed at raising the public awareness of local housing problems. Awarded the 2016 Leonore Annenberg Prize for Art and Social Change for a steel sculpture Runaway. Have participated in 20+ group exhibitions and 5 solo shows.
BAD EXAMPLE
Award-winning visual artist seeking interesting opportunities for residencies. Have participated in many exhibitions in the US and internationally.

The good example gives value and precisely describes the candidate’s artistic objective.

 

The bad example, in turn, is as generic as it gets.

 

3. Describe Your Education the Right Way

 

On resumes for art applications, education section comes near the very top.

 

The good news? It’s very easy to create it.

 

Limit yourself to the highest degree you’ve earned. Unless you’re fresh out of school include only:

  • Degree
  • Honors
  • Institution
  • Graduation Date

 

Education on an Artist Resume/CV—Example

 

MFA, cum laude, Studio Art 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
2012

 

Just finished your degree? You can add your GPA, plus your visual and written theses titles.

 

4. List Your Best Achievements: Grants, Awards, Fellowships

 

Imagine you’re Hito Steyerl… Would it be a good idea to focus on your most recent solo exhibition on your artist CV?

 

Hell no!

 

You would want to open with the #1 ranking in Art Review’s 2017 Power 100. (Well, alright, in that case writing “I’m Hito Steyerl” would do the job.)

Since you’re reading this, I’m assuming you’re not Hito. Yet.

 

So here’s a piece of advice on how to guide your career in the right direction.

 

Below the education section on your art CV, list your most impressive and competitive achievements: awards, grants, and fellowships.

 

How to List Awards on an Artist Resume

 

  • List your awards in reverse-chronological order.
  • Begin with the year you received the award, grant, or fellowship.
  • Follow with the name of the award.
  • Include the name of the institution that granted it.
  • Don’t add unnecessary descriptions, e.g. “this is a highly prestigious award.” That’s for the selection committees to decide.

 

Like in this example:

 

Artist Resume Example: Grants and Awards Sections

 

2016, The Leonore Annenberg Prize for Art and Social Change (The Creative Time Summit)
2013, Artist-in-Residency Fellowship, XYZ Art Center, Philadelphia, PA
2012, 3rd Place, ABC International Fine Art Competition

 

5. Impress Decision Makers with Your Exhibitions

 

Below your awards, include your exhibitions.

 

Not much exhibition experience?

 

Include all your exhibitions in a single section. List solo, two-person, and group exhibitions. You should also add your thesis exhibitions.

 

If you’ve participated in a lot of art shows, divide your exhibitions into sub-sections:

  • Solo Exhibitions
  • Two-Person Exhibitions
  • Group Exhibitions
  • Collaborative Projects

 

And, if you have been instructed to make your art resume brief (e.g. no more than 2 pages), include only the most impressive of your exhibitions in a Selected Exhibitions section.

 

Whichever strategy you’ll opt for, remember these general guidelines for artist resumes.

 

How to Put Exhibitions on an Artist Resume

 

  • List exhibitions in reverse-chronological order.
  • Include the year, the title of the show (in italics), the name and location of the venue.
  • In parentheses, list the names of jurors and curators.

 

Like this:

 

Artist Resume Sample: Exhibitions

 

Selected Exhibitions

 

2018, Solo Exhibition, Staring at the Sun, Anyname Gallery, New York, NY (Curated by John McKane)
2016, Solo Exhibition, Conflicting Futures, Lee Hansley Gallery, Raleigh, NC (Curated by Natalie Fox)
2013, Group Exhibition, The Practice of Space, XYZ Gallery, Newark, NJ (Juror: Frank Hallmann, Curated by Minnie DeMarco)

 

Easy, right?

 

6. Finish Strong With These Additional Sections

 

All of the above sections are must-haves on a good artist CV.

 

But—

 

Experienced artists might have more achievements to showcase. That’s what these additional sections are for.

 

If applicable, below your Exhibitions section, add sections for:

  • Commissions
  • Collections
  • Bibliography about Your Work
  • Publications
  • Professional Affiliations and Memberships
  • Conference Participation and Lectures
  • Media Presence

 

It doesn’t matter if you’re writing a conceptual artist resume, a performance artist resume, or even an emerging artist resume.

 

All entries listed above will provide tangible proof of your accomplishments.

 

If you’ve held full-time positions, describe them in an additional Work Experience section.

 

Here’s how:

 

How to Make an Artist Resume Job Description?

 

  • List your jobs in reverse-chronological order. Start with the most recent one, follow it with the one before it, and so on.
  • List your job title, institution name, and the dates worked.
  • Under each position, add up to 5 bullet points.
  • Don’t just list your responsibilities. Focus on measurable achievements.
  • Use resume action words: “planned and revised curricula,” instead of “responsible for curricula planning and revising”

 

See these sample artist resumes for reference.

 

Art Teacher Resume Examples: Job Descriptions

GOOD EXAMPLE

Art Teacher
Anytown University, Anytown, PA
2014–2015

  • Taught daily art classes to groups of 15 to 40 students.
  • Planned, evaluated, and revised curricula, course content, and course materials.
  • Explained and demonstrated artistic techniques: oil painting, watercolor, photography, and printmaking.
  • Received 90% positive feedback from anonymous end-of-term student surveys.
BAD EXAMPLE

2014 - 2015, Anytown University, Anytown, PA
Art Teacher

Responsibilities:

  • Teaching core curriculum art classes.
  • Demonstrating various art techniques.
  • Grading coursework.

If you’re currently being represented by a commercial gallery or a museum, in the footer of your artist CV you might want to add information on the current representation.

 

List the name of the gallery, address, and basic contact details. Like this:

 

Sample Artist CV: Current Representation

 

Current Representation: Gagosian Gallery, 555 W 24th St, New York City, NY 10011, (212) 741-111

 

Key Points

 

Here’s how to write an artist resume in 5 easy steps:

  • Use an elegant layout and a legible template.
  • Put link(s) to your online portfolio or professional website in the contact information.
  • Start by including your education at the top.
  • Order your art resume sections by competitiveness and prestige. The more impressive a given part of your resume, the higher it goes.
  • List your experience in reverse-chronological order.

 

If you need further assistance or have more questions, drop me a line in the comments. I’ll get back to you right away.

Rate my article
Average: 5 (4 votes)
Thank you for voting
Michael Tomaszewski, CPRW
Michael Tomaszewski, CPRW
Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Career Expert
Michael Tomaszewski is a resume expert and a career advice writer for ResumeLab. He is a certified professional resume writer (CPRW) and a member of the Professional Association of Résumé Writers & Career Coaches. Michael works with candidates across all career stages—from entry-level job seekers to executive coaches. His insights have been featured in CIO and Best Life Online. His mission is to help you tell the story behind your career and reinforce your professional brand by coaching you to create outstanding job application documents. More than one million readers read his career advice every month. For ResumeLab, Michael uses his connections to help you thrive in your career. From fellow career experts and insiders from all industries—LinkedIn strategists, communications consultants, scientists, entrepreneurs, digital nomads, or even FBI agents—to share their unique insights and help you make the most of your career. Michael has a degree in Liberal Arts and specializes in personal and professional storytelling.

Was it interesting? Here are similar articles