How to Write an Entry-Level Cover Letter With No Experience

How to write a cover letter with no experience, a first job cover letter, or an entry-level cover letter that makes the best impression.

Christian Eilers, CPRW
Christian Eilers, CPRW
How to Write an Entry-Level Cover Letter With No Experience

Seeing a targeted cover letter is what recruiters crave.

 

More than 50% of them want applicants to attach one to the resume.

 

So get your entry-level cover letter right the first time around and give your resume an extra boost.

 

Good news.

 

You’re just a few steps away from writing a perfect piece.

 

In this cover letter guide, you’ll see:

  • A winning entry-level cover letter template that lands interviews.
  • How to write a cover letter for a job with no experience in that field.
  • Dozens of top resume cover letter examples of what to say in the intro, body, and cover letter closing.
  • Expert tips and advice on writing a good cover letter with no work experience.

 

entry level cover letter example

 Create a cover letter that matches the design of your resume—pick from 18 professional templates and get a powerful resume + cover letter combo now.

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OK. Let’s start.

 

You've written a great entry-level resume. Now take a look at a sample entry-level cover letter:

 

Entry-Level Cover Letter With No Experience—Example:

 

Jessica Parrish

23-18 31st St
Astoria, NY 11105
(718) 555-4321
jess.parrish@gmail.com

 

January 1, 2019

 

Ms. Roberta Houston
Head of Human Resources
Mad Women Advertising
20 W 34th St.
New York, NY 10001

 

Dear Ms. Houston,

 

As a years-long SWA client, I was elated to see the opening you’ve advertised for a cloud engineer/technician. I have several accomplishments under my belt in the cloud area, such as my 33% decrease in onboarding time, and I’d love to continue these wins with SWA.

 

During my IT studies at university, I had several proud achievements which would translate well to the open position, and I’d love the opportunity to bring similar results to SWA. Some of those achievements include:

 

  • My ultimate project before leaving uni was a highly-scored cloud architecture activity (99.35%).
  • I identified and implemented a change in cloud providers (to SWA, actually!), and this led to both a 15% increase in task completion speed as well as a 22% reduction in costs.

 

Securing the cloud engineer position at SWA would really be the highlight of my twenties. I’ve long been a fan of your company and its culture, and I’d be honored to bring my skill set and know-how over as a new employee.

 

I would be delighted for the chance to prove that my successes throughout university can be replicated and built upon for a career at SWA.

 

Sincerely,

 

Jessica Parrish

 

P.S.—I would love the opportunity to sit down with you and show you how my 33% decrease in onboarding time could be replicated and improved upon at SWA.

 

1. Use the Right Format for Your Cover Letter With No Experience

 

Remember that first impression thing?

 

Better not blow it with bad a cover letter format. So, create a neat and elegant entry-level cover letter by following a few simple rules.

 

Here’s what to put on a cover letter:

  • Your contact information
  • Date of writing
  • The recipient’s contact info
  • Greeting/salutation
  • Introductory paragraph
  • Body paragraphs
  • Closing paragraph
  • Complimentary close
  • Your signature
  • A postscript (maybe)

 

An entry-level cover letter has to be tailored to the specific entry-level position you are applying for. It should concisely describe your relevant work, skills, education on a resume, and experience that make you the best fit for the job.

 

Now let’s see how to write a cover letter when you have no experience.

Expert Hint: A cover letter adds a human touch to your job application, but don’t be too relaxed. It is still a formal letter, so make sure you treat it like one!

2. Address Your Entry-Level Cover Letter the Right Way

 

A professional cover letter address section comprises three parts: your details, the date, and then their info.

 

Entry-Level Cover Letter Address—Example

 

At the very top goes your contact info:

 

Jessica Parrish

23-18 31st St

Astoria, NY 11105

(718) 555-4321

jess.parrish@gmail.com

 

Next is the cover letter date:

 

January 1, 2019

 

A doozy, no?

 

Finally, add the manager’s contact info below the date:

 

Ms. Roberta Houston

Head of Human Resources

Mad Women Advertising

20 W 34th St.

New York, NY 10001

 

Add the addressee’s name, followed by their professional title, followed by the company name and address for the best cover letter header.

 

That’s how to address a cover letter. Simple, huh?

 

How to address a cover letter without contact details?

 

Easy. Just skip the specific hiring manager or employer name (and their title, of course).

Expert Hint: Leave off any extra details which you may have included in your first-time resume, such as social profile links, personal website URLs, etc. Cover letters don’t require these, and the hiring manager can get them from your resume anyway.

3. Start Your Entry-Level Cover Letter with a Good Intro

 

First, one more easy item—the cover letter greeting:

 

Dear Ms. Houston,

 

What if you don’t know the manager’s name?

 

Forget that “To whom it may concern” phrase. Go for “Dear Hiring Manager”. It makes a better impression and sounds less generic.

 

The right salutation won’t get their attention, though. What will?

 

Mentioning your best accomplishment.

 

Ever watched Shark Tank?

 

Contestants compete for business investment by trying to woo them with initial proposals and promises of guaranteed ROI.

 

Your entry-level cover letter introduction is similar, but you have just a sentence or two to catch their fancy.

 

Here are two sample entry-level cover letter opening statements:

 

Entry-Level Cover Letter First Sentence—Sample

Good Example
As a years-long SWA client, I was elated to see the opening you’ve advertised for a cloud engineer/technician. I have several accomplishments under my belt in the cloud area, such as my 33% decrease in onboarding time, and I’d love to continue these wins with SWA.

 

Bad Example
I am a university graduate seeking a job in information technology with a company where I can hone my skills, move up the company ladder, and get promoted after a while. I am skilled in many IT areas, including networking, cloud engineering, and cybersecurity.

 

What makes the first a good cover letter example? Why is the second cover letter intro paragraph bad?

 

The second example is super generic—it could apply to any entry-level positions in IT in the world.

 

The first example fits like a glove, perfectly tailored to this specific job. On top of that, it shows enthusiasm and liveliness—the energy from the excitement was almost palpable.

Expert Hint: A cover letter is also known as a letter of interest. So besides just showing your interest in the job, catch their interest, too.

4. Add Achievements to Your Entry-Level Cover Letter

 

Any healthy relationship needs to be balanced, and a working relationship is no different.

 

So, in this body section of your cover letter with no experience, you’ve got to show them both why you’re the ideal hire for them and how they are the company of your dreams.

 

This body could be one lengthy paragraph, but I’d suggest two paragraphs.

 

Since you’re courting them, put their interests first:

 

Entry-Level Cover Letter Achievements—Sample

 

During my IT studies at university, I had several proud achievements which would translate well to the open position, and I’d love the opportunity to bring similar results to SWA. Some of those achievements include:

  • My ultimate project before leaving uni was a highly-scored cloud architecture activity (99.35%).
  • I identified and implemented a change in cloud providers (to SWA, actually!), and this led to both an 15% increase in task completion speed as well as a 22% reduction in costs.

 

 

This cover letter sample shows them you know your stuff with numbers, quantifying it to prove what you’re saying is true.

 

Plus—

 

It shows your enthusiasm, too.

 

Now, let them know why they’re your ideal workplace:

 

Securing the cloud engineer position at SWA would really be the highlight of my twenties. I’ve long been a fan of your company and its culture, and I’d be honored to bring my skill set and know-how over as a new employee.

 

 

How about that example cover letter paragraph? It’s about you, yeah, but it’s still really about them. You compliment them fully, and they can feel that they’d be getting a dedicated team member were they to hire you.

Expert Hint: Use active voice on your first-time cover letter. Don’t say “the team was trained by me” (that’s passive voice). Instead, say “I trained the team.” It’s clear and concise.

5. End a Cover Letter for Entry-Level Jobs with a Call-To-Action

 

Like our beginning, the closing of a cover letter consists of three parts: a closing sentence or two, the complimentary close, and your signature.

 

Here’s an example cover letter closing statement:

 

Entry-Level Cover Letter Ending—Example

 

I would be delighted for the chance to prove that my successes throughout university can be replicated and built upon for a career at SWA.

 

It’s a simple call-to-action which sums it all up nicely by insisting that you deserve that entry-level interview.

 

Then, just the complimentary close:

 

Sincerely,

 

And then your name, and done!

 

“Regards” will also work, but if you want even more good cover letter alternatives, head on over to our guide on ending a cover letter properly.

Expert Hint: To really catch their attention, speak in the company’s “voice.” Check their website’s about page. For example, if they're upbeat and enthusiastic, use that style in your cover letter. Likewise, if they are formal and professional, be more reserved on your no-experience cover letter.

6. Win Them Over with The Postscript

 

Whether it’s a first cover letter with no experience or an executive cover letter with decades of experience, here’s one trick which works:

 

Add a postscript (that “P.S.”) after your signature.

 

A postscript is meant to be used as an afterthought, but we’ll use this clever cover letter hack instead to show forethought.

 

Here’s an example of a cover letter postscript:

 

Cover Letter Postscript—Example

 

P.S.—I would love the opportunity to sit down with you and show you how my 33% decrease in onboarding time could be replicated and improved upon at SWA.

 

See that?

 

A postscript on an entry-level cover letter makes a great hack. It always draws the HR manager’s eyes, even if they hadn’t read the rest of your cover letter without experience.

 

Not only is this letter of interest sample postscript personalized to them, but they’ll be all but powerless not to go back to the beginning and give your cover letter a thorough read!

Expert Hint: How long should a cover letter be? Your cover letter should fill between half and three-quarters of a single page. Keep it three to four body paragraphs in length, which is about 200 - 300 words. Got more to say? Address it during the interview!

Key Points

 

To sum up how to write a cover letter for a job application without experience, keep these key points in mind:

  • Great cover letters add to your resume, so don’t repeat it verbatim.
  • A cover letter is a formal letter, so follow a formal letter format (start with a professional header, your contact info, and proper salutation).
  • You’ve got to grab their attention from the very start, so a compelling intro is a must (use your flashiest accomplishment).
  • The body paragraphs should show enthusiasm and why you’re the perfect fit for the position (use numbers to show off with your achievements).
  • A postscript after your signature is a clever hack to get one last word in at the end.
  • Read our cover letter advice for more strategies on sending one that'll blow them away.

 

Have any questions on how to write a great cover letter with no experience? Let’s discuss it here below in the comments, and, as always, thanks for reading!

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Christian Eilers, CPRW
Christian Eilers, CPRW
Certified Professional Résumé Writer, Career Expert
Christian Eilers, a Certified Professional Résumé Writer (CPRW), is a resume expert and a career advice writer at ResumeLab. His insights and career guides have been published by Business Insider, FitSmallBusiness, Business News Daily, OppLoans, First for Women, and UpJourney, among others. Christian offers comprehensive advice on career development and each step of the job search, from start to finish and beyond. His guides cover looking for new jobs, sending application documents such as resumes and cover letters, acing interview questions, and settling into the new position. Since 2017, he has written over 200 in-depth, meticulously-researched career advice articles in collaboration with the most renowned career experts in the world. Hundreds of thousands of readers visit Christian’s articles each month. Christian majored in Communication & Culture, Anthropology at the City University of New York. In his spare time, he enjoys traveling and learning about cultures and traditions from around the world.

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